How Flexible is Your Writing Style?

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Image Credit: Caitlin Mitchell

In my years of young experience in writing content for individual client, I have learnt one thing – FLEXIBILITY.

So, picture this scenario. Writer A writes poems a lot. He shares these poems on Instagram and has a following; lots of people are wowed by his poetic skill.

So, an individual approaches Writer A and asks if he can produce content for an animation video script. Writer A rejects the offfer. He is a poet, he says.

Meanwhile, Writer B who is also a poet is approached by the same brand. Writer B accepts the offer and goes on to research about he can tweak his already-present writing skill to suit the animation script.

Writer B is flexible. And that is the stuff great content writers are made of.

There is no content that you cannot write if you have the basic writing skills down pat, and are willing to research.

No Content.

Now, how to be a flexible writer…

Explore new interests

Even if you are the slightest interested in something you wrote keep practicing it until you get better. Passion plays a big role and how we develop our skills.

I, for one, once tried my hand at fiction writing (yay!) with this re-told Bible story here.

Yes, I did have to stretch myself and go beyond my comfort zone of the usual poem and straightforward content, and I sure was happy to have completed it. I even sent it in as a submission for the Farafina Creative Writing workshop, but that’s another story for another day (LOL. Like, who sends in a bible story?).

If  when you try, you see that you’re not that good at that form of writing, that isn’t a sign to give up (just yet). Keep working at it and soon, you’ll become a writer of many trades.

Take on new challenges/ varying opportunities
You don’t want to be a stiff writer who only sticks to one thing and masters that one talent.

Challenge yourself to make your writing better by engaging in writing exercises (on the internet and offline too). Find new ways via Google to get your creative juices flowing and test your writing skills. Don’t just stick to one aspect of writing that you’re good at but explore more and become good at those too.

Use writing prompts

A writing prompt is a brief passage of text that provides a potential topic idea or starting point for an original essay, report, journal entry, story, poem, or other form of writing. Photographs and works of art can also serve as writing prompts.

The aim of a writer prompt is to stir up an initial idea in the writer’s head and which then allows him or her tell the rest of the story or essay on his or her own. An example:

Imagine you have just one day left to live. Write a 300-word good-bye letter to your best friend. 

See? A writing prompt opens up your mind to possibilities with interesting or intriguing topic ideas.

Wondering how to find writing prompts?
Just Google it up. Select great ones, and…write!

References: 

Becoming A Flexible Writer by Shaquanda Dalton.  http://learnasyouwrite.com/becoming-a-flexible-writer/

https://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/advisor/just-does-content-writer-anyway-113538300.html

 

 

15 comments

  1. AlexisChateauPR · January 13

    As the owner of 4 websites, and admin of several others, the most important part of being a good and flexible writer we find, is the ability to follow rules. We get a lot of submissions from people who don’t bother to read our pitching and submission guidelines, even though we caution them again on the contact page where they grab our email address.
    The guidelines include information on not just how to pitch, but how to mirror our tone and writing style for submissions. You can’t be flexible without first understanding the brand you’re writing for.
    When we get pitches that ignore the guideline, we see it as a lack of attention to detail and no regard for how content works on that specific website.
    About 90% or more of the pitches we get are like that. We delete them.

    • demilhadey · January 13

      Very true. I agree. Ability to stick to the rules of your eventual client is part of being flexible. The irony though…

      • AlexisChateauPR · January 16

        Yup. I do find it, ironic. I get an email telling me how experienced and professional they are, and how many years they’ve been freelancing, but they never bothered to read the guidelines lol. Ridiculous.

        Have a great day, Thanks for chatting with me!

        —- Alex

      • demilhadey · January 31

        It was a pleasure. Saw this reply so late. Your comments made me think! Thank you! 🙂

      • AlexisChateauPR · February 2

        No problem. Thanks for chatting! ^_^

  2. David Egwede · January 13

    Another wonderfully crafted and helpful write-up. Thank you Demilade.

    • Light Elo · January 16

      Wow Awesome Tips /Directives …God bless you Ma’am

      • demilhadey · January 31

        You’re very welcome, Light! Ameeeen. 🙂

    • demilhadey · January 31

      Late reply to your comment, but regardless, I appreciate your readership, David! 🙂

  3. Vijay Sagar · January 13

    Love the simplicity and authenticity of this article.
    Have recently started writing articles and as you rightfully indicated, the practice helps me open up heart & mind well. And your flexible tips are well noted too:) Thanks Demilade.

    • demilhadey · January 31

      Awwww, thanks Vijay. It does, indeed. You’re very welcome.

  4. dpranita583 · 17 Days Ago

    Thanks for nice article & good motivation,

    • demilhadey · 12 Days Ago

      Youre very welcome pranita!

      • dpranita583 · 10 Days Ago

        since how many days you are writing?

      • demilhadey · 9 Days Ago

        I do apologize for the late reply. Wish i could have replied sooner.

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